Elmira/Corning Regional Airport

Explaining 9/11

Written By: Joe Melillo

Children hear a lot about 9/11, and parents are tasked with the responsibility of explaining its true significance for the next generation.

Explaining 9/11
 

September 11, 2012

Twin Tiers (WENY) - Children hear a lot about 9/11, and parents are tasked with the responsibility of explaining its true significance for the next generation. For a generation of young kids across the country, they have no memory of the day that has shaped our world. All they have are just stories and pictures. Those pictures often lead to questions that are difficult for parents to answer. Carlos Perez helped clean up debris at ground zero.

    “A lot of chaos, a lot of smoke, a lot of fire and firefighters laying in three feet of ash exhausted," says Perez “I just didn't know what to do so the next morning I just took off and headed to the world trade center I managed to get it.”

     He couldn't hide where he was from his sons who were five and three years old at the time.

      "I would come home that day filthy why are you so dirty why are are you so tired why are you crying so I basically told them right away.”

      For parents like the Sullivan's, the subject is almost impossible to avoid.

      “It's hard because they saw pictures on the news last night and they said 'wow mom look at that and what happened?'. I kind of dodged the questions a little bit because you don't want to go strait into what happened with a 4 or 5 year old,” says Lorrie Sullivan.

      “It's going to be tough explaining it, why is there so much hate in the world I think its going to be tough for them to swallow.,” says Kevin Sullivan.

      Ted Goldwyn was working in a building that was two blocks north of the World Trade Center.

      “We saw the top of the building just burning and sitting there staring saying wow.”

      He has three children now and has explained to them what happened that day.

      “Trying to be open and explain the reality of the situations in a way that hopefully they will understand and take to heart and use to make the world a better place in the future,” says Goldwyn.

      And like kids do, they can make something horrible into something beautiful.

     “Having our kids to kind of to hold onto while you remember the difficult moments really makes it a lot easier and allows us to look towards the future.”