Elmira/Corning Regional Airport

10,000 Feared Dead in Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan

MANILA The Philippines was still trying to comprehend the destruction that Typhoon Haiyan brought to this string of islands in the Pacific on Sunday.

Rescue and relief efforts were having trouble getting to the scene of the most damage, such as Tacloban, where even the Red Cross saw its offices damaged.

"This area has been totally ravaged," said Sebastien Sujobert, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Tacloban. "Many lives were lost, a huge number of people are missing, and basic services such as drinking water and electricity have been cut off," he said.

Corpses hung from tree branches and were scattered along sidewalks and among flattened buildings. People raided grocery stores and gas stations in search of food, fuel and water.

As many as 10,000 people may have died when one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded destroyed entire villages and devastated cities with huge waves and winds of nearly 150 mph.

A weakened but still powerful Haiyan was churning through the South China Sea and made landfall in northern Vietnam, which evacuated tens of thousands of people.

At the White House, President Obama said he and his wife Michelle said they are "deeply saddened'' by the death and damage in the Philippines and said the United States is assisting relief and recovery efforts. He praised the country's people for "incredible resiliency.''