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Painted Post Not Dissolving Into Erwin

Written By: Joe Melillo

Tempted by the intriguing probability of tax relief, members of the Painted Post community came up with the idea to dissolve their village into the Town of Erwin.

Painted Post Vote Results

 

The dissolution resolution failed 291 to 376.

January 24, 2013
Painted Post (WENY) - Tempted by the intriguing probability of tax relief, members of the Painted Post community came up with the idea to dissolve their village into the Town of Erwin. That idea was put to a vote tonight, as the village held a public referendum to let neighbors decide whether or not to merge with Erwin, but the results are in, and Painted Post will remain just the way it is.
     
History of the area known as Painted post goes back to the dawn of our country. The local Indian tribes literally marked their territory with a wooden painted post, establishing their identity. Sheri Golder from the Corning Painted Post Historical Society says, “It was a really a power representation for the Indians.”
    
Thursday, current residents headed to the polls fighting to preserve their power, and overall identity, by not dissolving into the Town of Erwin. Amy Tryon was the committee chair of Save the Post Committee.
     
“There's so much family history here, we have generations upon generations of people that have grown up in painted post and they don't want to lose their home or their identity,” says Tryon.
     
Amy Hargrave's husband grew up in Painted Post.
     
“My husband was brought up here and this is where we always lived,” says Hargrave.
    
Even people who have lived in the village for a short time feel connected. Brian Francis and active duty serviceman for the army has been living in Painted Post for two years.
    
“Everyone is tight, its nice to have a small police department, everybody knows everybody here. I joined the local fire department so I am a volunteer guy. Its just a nice area and I've lived in a lot of places and this is rare,” says Francis.
     
For the people who voted no to the dissolution, it was a fight to keep control of a village deeply rooted in history.
    
“Nobody wants to lose painted post nobody wants to lose their identity and we just want to keep our autonomy. We just want to be independent from Erwin and keep government local,” says Tryon.