WENY News - The Latest: Cuomo Defeats Nixon in NY Gubernatorial Primary

The Latest: Cuomo Defeats Nixon in NY Gubernatorial Primary

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NEW YORK (AP) - The Latest on New York's Democratic primary (all times local):
  
9:25 p.m.
  
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has defeated Democratic primary challenger Cynthia Nixon to win his party's nomination for a third term.
  
Cuomo had far greater financial resources going into the matchup, and polls suggested he held a commanding lead before Thursday's primary.
  
Nixon, an activist and former "Sex and the City" star, had hoped to become the latest liberal challenger to unseat a powerful insider.
  
Cuomo's campaign dismissed her as inexperienced and touted the governor's work to push back against President Donald Trump.
  
His victory comes despite several missteps, including a widely condemned mailer that questioned Nixon's support for Jewish people. Nixon has two Jewish children and called the attack "sleazy."
  
Cuomo will face Republican Marc Molinaro and independent Stephanie Miner in November's general election.
  
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9 p.m.
  
The polls have closed in New York, where Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo is trying to fend off a challenge from actress and activist Cynthia Nixon in the nation's last primary before Election Day.
  
Results coming in Thursday night will show whether Nixon's liberal attacks on the centrist Cuomo resonated with voters in a season where left-leaning Democrats have won surprise victories.
  
Voters across the state also cast ballots in a hotly contested party primary for the state's attorney general. Four Democrats are facing off for the party's nomination in a race that polls have shown to be very close.
  
Several incumbent Democratic state senators are also facing primary opposition, including a group of legislators who have been targeted for breaking with party leadership and siding with Republicans.
  
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8:40 p.m.
  
New York's attorney general is congratulating the four Democrats running in a primary to replace her and says she's proud to have kept the office going after Eric Schneiderman's (SHNEYE'-dur-muhnz) sudden resignation in May.
  
Barbara Underwood tweeted Thursday before polls closed that the candidates "believe in the power of this office" and have given voters "a choice for the future."
  
Fordham law professor Zephyr (ZEF'-er) Teachout, New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney and ex-Hillary Clinton adviser Leecia Eve are running for the Democratic nomination. Underwood declined to run for election.
  
The winner faces little-known Republican attorney Keith Wofford in November.
  
Underwood says she hopes it's clear the office "is the sum of all its staff. I am so proud to be your AG."
  
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8:30 p.m.
  
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (dih BLAH'-zee-oh) says his son ran into bureaucratic trouble at a polling site and wasn't able to cast his ballot by machine in the state's primary.
  
The Democrat said it happened Thursday at a polling station near Gracie Mansion, the mayor's official residence.
  
He says his son, Dante, brought a card showing he was registered as a Democrat but was told his name wasn't on a list so he had to vote by affidavit ballot.
  
Those votes do still get counted.
  
The mayor is a critic of the city's board of elections. He says the episode is proof the "system is broken."
  
The elections board responded with a tweet, saying that Dante de Blasio was not removed from the rolls and that his name was in polling site records.
  
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6:45 p.m.
  
Gov. Andrew Cuomo and activist and actress Cynthia Nixon are making their final pitches as their closely watched and sometimes nasty Democratic primary contest comes to a close.
  
Cuomo spoke to reporters after casting his own ballot in Westchester County on Thursday, saying he's the best-qualified candidate not only to govern but also to push back against President Donald Trump.
  
Nixon cast her ballot in Manhattan and greeted subway riders. The activist and former "Sex and the City" star has faulted Cuomo's handling of the city's aging subways and says he isn't a true liberal.
  
Democratic primary voters will also choose candidates for attorney general and the state Legislature in the nation's final primary before Election Day.
  
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12:45 p.m.
  
Gov. Andrew Cuomo and activist actress Cynthia Nixon have cast their votes in New York's Democratic primary election.
  
Nixon posed for photos with supporters in Manhattan's Union Square before she voted Thursday at a community center. Cuomo appeared at a polling station in suburban Mount Kisco with his girlfriend, Sandra Lee.
  
Democrats across New York are also choosing their candidates for attorney general and the state Legislature in the nation's last primary election of 2018.
  
The most-watched race is the fiercely fought contest between Cuomo and Nixon.
  
She's a high-profile example of an insurgent left-wing trying to oust establishment incumbents.
  
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11 a.m.
  
Democrats across New York are choosing their candidates for governor, attorney general and the state Legislature in the nation's last primary election of 2018.
  
The most-watched race is a fiercely fought contest between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and activist actress Cynthia Nixon.
  
She's a high-profile example of an insurgent left-wing trying to oust establishment incumbents.
  
President Donald Trump might want to keep an eye on the attorney general primary.
  
Fordham law professor Zephyr Teachout, New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney and former Hillary Clinton adviser Leecia Eve have all vowed to be a legal thorn in the Republican president's side.
  
Polls show that race very close going into election day.
  
Voting began in some cities early Thursday and starts in other places at noon.

(Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

9/13/2018 9:29:16 PM (GMT -4:00)

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