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Milk Consumption Down

Written By: Joe Melillo

Experts have seen a sharp decline in consumption of milk, a major product for the economy in New York and Pennsylvania.

Milk Consumption Down
December 12, 2012
Twin Tiers (WENY) - Experts have seen a sharp decline in consumption of milk, a major product for the economy in New York and Pennsylvania. Since 1975 Milk consumption has dropped 30 percent, and reports show that trend is continuing. The sharp decline in milk consumption troubling for the already struggling dairy industry. It seems that recently the Non-Dairy Milk products are flooding the market and is part of the reason for the decline.
   
“Growing up we used to have the glass milk, you know Byrn Dairy glass milk everything changed since then,” says Minier's Supermarket Manager Paul Minier.
    
When it comes to milk, the times are changing. Almond, Coconut, Rice, Organic, more and more milk products are appearing on store shelves, making it hard for businesses like Minier's to keep up. At miners the milk section has changed a lot in fact 1its doubled in the past decade. Now they carry, pure milk, coconut, Silk milk and Organic milk all because of consumer demand.
    
“More and more people ask for that type of milk, soy products the rice milk the almond milk you name it we have it because people are demanding that. So you see our section shrink down in the traditional milk and we've grown in the other section,” says Paul.
    
According to the US Department of Agriculture Americans drank an average of 20.2 gallons of milk last year, that's down 3,3 percent, the biggest drop since 1975. Here in New York, from 1998 to 2007 the number of dairy farms dropped from 8700 to 5700. Bill Blackson from the USDA says the good news is milk production per cow went up over that time.
    
“I think the smaller ones that go out of business today are just not big enough to be available today, but they don't totally disappear, they'll sell their cows to other farms and those farms become bigger. So we have farms that are much larger then we used to be.”
    
Although organic milk sales are growing, they only account for about 4 percent of retail sales.